CMM / CMMI / SPICE

In 2000, the extended the CMMI model was published with a focus on systems engineering and software development. The predecessor of the Capability Maturity Model Integration, the CMM (Capability Maturity Model), was developed in 1991 by the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, USA. Like other CMMs, the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) models provide guidance to use when developing processes. The CMMI models are not processes or process descriptions.

The purpose of the CMMI is to provide guidance for improving your organisation’s processes and your ability to manage the development, acquisition, and maintenance of products or services
CMMI integrates proven approaches into a structure that

• Helps your organization examine the effectiveness of your processes
• Establishes priorities for improvement
• Helps you implement these improvements

How CMMI is different:

The CMMI provides an integrated, consistent, enduring framework for enterprise-wide process improvement and can accommodate new initiatives as future needs are identified. Unlike single-discipline or stove-pipe models that can result in confusion and higher costs when implemented together.

Who it is for: 

Those providing systems and software engineering products and services to organizations who transform customer need expectations, and constraints into products, and supporting these products throughout their life. If you manufacture, code, analyze, maintain or document a product, you need this

Consulting and Training

Contact us

322, Pride purple square, 3rd Floor, Kalewadi Phata,
Wakad, Pune, Maharashtra-411057
Phone: 91-020- 27272012,
91-9811207965,
91-8605002256

E-mail: bose@corequalityconsultants.com

CMMI Maturity Levels

A maturity level is a well-defined evolutionary plateau toward achieving a mature software process. Each maturity level provides a layer in the foundation for continuous process improvement.
In CMMI models with a staged representation, there are five maturity levels designated by the numbers 1 through 5

  1. Initial
  2. Managed
  3. Defined
  4. Quantitatively Managed
  5. Optimizing

Level 5 Optimizing

Focus

Continuous Process Improvement

Key Process Area

  • Organizational Innovation and Deployment
  • Causal Analysis and Resolution

Result

Highest Quality / Lowest Risk

Level 4 Quantitatively Managed

Focus

Quantitatively Managed

Key Process Area

  • Organizational Process Performance
  • Quantitative Project Management

Result

Highest Quality / Lowest Risk

Level 3 Defined

Focus

Process Standardization

Key Process Area

  • Requirements Development
  • Technical Solution
  • Product Integration
  • Verification
  • Validation
  • Organizational Process Focus
  • Organizational Process Definition
  • Organizational Training
  • Integrated Project Mgmt (with IPPD extras)
  • Risk Management
  • Decision Analysis and Resolution
  • Integrated Teaming (IPPD only)
  • Org. Environment for Integration (IPPD only)
  • Integrated Supplier Management (SS only)

Result

Medium Quality / Medium Risk

Level 2 Managed

Focus

Basic Project Management

Key Process Area

  • Requirements Management
  • Project Planning
  • Project Monitoring and Control
  • Supplier Agreement Management
  • Measurement and Analysis
  • Process and Product Quality Assurance
  • Configuration Management

Result

Low Quality / High Risk

Level 1 Initial

Focus

Process is informal and Adhoc

Result

Lowest Quality / Highest Risk